Emily Thornhill reflects on religious sites in the first article in her new series for Cornish Story exploring place through photography.  ‘God’s Little Acre’ is a study of the tiny and often forgotten Anglican churches and chapels of Cornwall, that reside in the most secluded of places. Serving sometimes only handfuls of people, these intricate…Continue Reading “God’s Little Acre”

Malcolm Gould writes about the historical impact of mining on a remote area that has been totally deindustrialised with the passage of time. By the 13th Century the Cornish tin industry was already an important part of the local landscape within the area surrounding Gunwen and Helman Tor. A substantial amount of tin came from…Continue Reading “Mining in the Helman Tor Area”

Helman Tor

Colin C. Short writes the first of a short series of articles by different authors relating to the cultural heritage of the Helman Tor area of Mid-Cornwall.  A succession of buildings from four different branches of Methodism creates a series of overlapping spiritual landscapes in the parishes adjacent to Helman Tor – roughly the parishes…Continue Reading “The Spiritual Landscape of the Helman Tor Area: Chapels and Meeting Places”

Tony Mansell continues this series with an article about this charming Cornish village where his wife was born and where his family lived for many years. Mention the little village of Mithian (1) and most folk will think of the Rose in Vale Country House Hotel or its gem of a pub, the Miners Arms….Continue Reading “Mysterious Mithian”

The top photograph is the first view of Blackwater gained when travelling westwards (Photo: Clive Benney)   Tony Mansell’s second article in this series places a magnifying glass over the village of Blackwater where he attended primary school, broke his leg in the playground and regularly “raided” the local shop for sweets on his long…Continue Reading “Blackwater”

For 2 years, I went to university in Oxford. Home to 175,000 people, it’s overflowing with students, home to three universities and dozens of shops. There are tourists galore lining up to buy their “University of Oxford” hoodies, Oxford snow globes, and Oxford magnets. I’m used to tourists, but, as a girl who has spent…Continue Reading “Stars and bluebells”